All Reviews

The opening salvo in what's to be an ongoing series, THE AGENCY introduces the character of Dan Calder.
Posted by Karen
There's a particularly interesting idea at the heart of A MOMENT'S SILENCE.
Posted by Karen
Hats off to the author for working so well within the constraints that would have been present when writing NOT A SOUND.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Your reviewer is new to this (incredibly popular) author so it was a reading requirement to find out (reasonably quickly) why it is that author Mary Kubica is in the ‘must read’ stable of so many crime and mystery readers. It didn’t take long.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
This is one that's definitely going to come down to personal taste, connection with characters (and maybe place / events).
Posted by Karen
This is a beautifully written, truthfully observed and engaging novel about families, friendship, love and loss.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Bailey is part of a vanguard of new, female Australian crime authors, and a signal that the Australian crime scene continues to flourish.
Posted by Robert Goodman
There's nary a hitch in MARLBOROUGH MAN. The characters work, the plot is cleverly executed and the sense of place is visceral.
Posted by Karen
There's something especially sobering about crime fiction that is obviously set in such a real, contemporary and frightening scenario.
Posted by Karen
Australian author Megan Goldin’s debut does tick off on some of the aspects of the domestic noir sub-genre indicated by the title: strained domestic relationship, creepy controlling male character and an unreliable narrator. And she does so in a way that brings something new and a little chilling to the genre.
Posted by Robert Goodman
​The White Road is a hard novel to pigeon hole. Part adventure novel, part slacker comes of age novel and part ghost story. Sarah Lotz plumbs the depths and scales the heights in a book that is not for claustrophobes or those with vertigo.
Posted by Robert Goodman
The Girl Who Was Taken does not have any of the domestic noir genre trappings of the current crop of ‘Girl’ books with which it might be compared (on title alone). Rather, it is an effective, page turning crime thriller with a well handled mystery and an engaging and resourceful protagonist.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Eddie Flynn continues to be one of the great thriller protagonists of recent years. He has the skills of a conman when he needs them, the tactical brain and silk tongue of a trail lawyer and every now and then goes all action hero.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Rachel Seiffert’s A Boy in Winter, explores the Nazi occupation of the Ukraine and the impact on its Jewish population by focusing on one small village.
Posted by Robert Goodman
SOMETHING FOR NOTHING is a perfect example of the lighter, tongue in cheek style of true-blue Aussie Crime Fiction that is increasingly being done particularly well.
Posted by Karen
Looks like this might be the first novel in an ongoing series which frankly is excellent news. Eva Destruction can only get better with age, wisdom and a litre or ten more of dodgy wine with her mates.
Posted by Karen
In a short author interview at the end of Ragdoll, Daniel Cole explains how he put the novel together. He wanted something that was less po-faced that the run of the mill British television crime drama but something not as cheesy as American television crime drama like Castle.
Posted by Robert Goodman
It is its own form of hybrid robot, noir crime, space opera, corporate skulduggery story and when it works or when it doesn’t work it does so on its own terms.
Posted by Robert Goodman
You do want to Lily to succeed, as her clumsy and inept forays into investigating the murder of her neighbour are almost charming.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
FULL BORE, as is with the other works by this author, does leave you feeling a little bit melancholic about our shared Australian past but reassures us that life goes on and that there will always be much more to experience.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Dennis Lehane takes a swerve away from his long running Kenzie and Genaro series (which includes Gone, Baby Gone) and his recent prohibition and gangsters trilogy to deliver a psychological thriller of sorts.
Posted by Robert Goodman
DEAD AGAIN is a different kettle of fish - it's a brave undertaking, taking a raw, real life scenario and fictionalising it.
Posted by Karen
Vik and Stubø are a great pairing ..., and re-reading PUNISHMENT was an opportunity to remind myself of what a great series this is.
Posted by Karen
A very clever and absorbing book, THE GIRL BEFORE is a psychological thriller that delivers.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Read without guilt! A SIMPLE FAVOUR scoots along at a breakneck space and is anything but predictable.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Compulsive, entertaining and tense reading from an author to watch.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
...but if you stick with it you are given plenty of glimpses of who Otto Berliner is and where he's likely to be heading.
Posted by Karen
Part history lesson, part social exploration, the Sean Duffy series from Irish-Australian writer Adrian McKinty is required crime fiction reading. Reviewed at: Newtown Review of Books
Posted by Karen
Police at the Station… continues to be the best of crime fiction. McKinty uses the genre to effectively open a window into a time and place, using the mystery and Duffy’s travails to further illuminate the history that he is so effectively conveying.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Bill Hosking is well known in legal circles, probably less outside of them, but his many years of experience, and sheer number of cases that he appeared in - mostly as defence counsel, is a telling testimony about this man's standing, and understanding, of the law.
Posted by Karen
...this is extremely entertaining and engaging crime fiction - with a great central character to boot.
Posted by Karen
Read for this month's face to face bookclub, another book that divided opinion which is always a good thing.
Posted by Karen
If ever there was a book that shows that the Best Swedish Crime Novel award needs to be closely followed, QUICKSAND is it.
Posted by Karen
Debut author Anna Snoekstra has taken on one of the more difficult challenges in writing fiction - creating an engaging, morally ambiguous central character, who sometimes borders on unlikeable. Reviewed at Reviewing the Evidence
Posted by Karen
The world seems to be full of highly trained, disaffected, black ops, renegade loners who are trying to do good deeds while being hunted down by their government.
Posted by Robert Goodman
... compelling and frequently discomforting reading.
Posted by Karen
The fact that this subject is handled in this manner, within a plot that's multi-levelled, that involves the members of the self-help trial group, and the facilitators equally is cleverly done, and it's seamlessly delivered.
Posted by Karen
Author Tony Cavanaugh has had a long and illustrious career in film and tv and thus brings that excellent crafting of place and character to his crime novels. All of his creations are wholly convincing and though sketched with typical Australian economy, they are entirely recognizable in their landscape.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Everything in YOU wrong-foots the reader, creating a challenging reading experience of very intimate personal time with rather unpleasant people, wrapped up in obsession, fuelled by the manipulation of technology to control.
Posted by Karen
It's been a while since finishing a debut book made me mildly miffed I'd have to wait a while for the second in the series.
Posted by Karen
Lot of sitting around waiting recently - so an ebook, and something set in Asia for a change.
Posted by Karen
THE GREAT SWINDLE is a fascinating book. It's not universally uplifting and it's not overbearingly depressing. It is, however, unerringly clever.
Posted by Karen
Sanders shows a keen ability to capture the American vernacular, speech patterns and settings and proves he is able to play in the same weapon-filled sandpit as some of his more famous American counterparts.
Posted by Karen
Candice Fox announced herself as an Australian crime writer to watch with her Ned Kelly Award winning debut Hades, followed up a year later by its award winning sequel Eden.
Posted by Robert Goodman
If two Ned Kelly Awards and one short-listing hasn't given you a big enough hint already, CRIMSON LAKE should absolutely confirm that Candice Fox is an Australian writer of immense ability.
Posted by Karen
Sanders shows a keen ability to capture the American vernacular, speech patterns and settings and proves he is able to play in the same weapon-filled sandpit as some of his more famous American counterparts.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Garry Disher has two successful major crime series out – very different from each other, both of the highest possible standard. Full Review At Newtown Review of Books

Posted by Karen
... this is a series for fans of crime fiction. It's introspective, considered, thoughtful, insightful and brilliant.
Posted by Karen
Anyone taking bets on a third featuring these characters would probably shorten the odds at a rapid rate of knots after reading this.
Posted by Karen
In The Girl From Venice, Cruz Smith effectively captures a point in time.
Posted by Robert Goodman