All Reviews

Bill Beverly has taken out 2016 Golden Dagger Awards for both best crime fiction and best debut for Dodgers. This is the type of crime novel that is steeped in the criminal world.
Posted by Robert Goodman
The Whistler is John Grisham’s twenty-ninth legal thriller and once again shows that the formula which he practically invented in his early books – a combination of social commentary, legal shenanigans and fairly low key action that occasionally generates real thrills – is still working.
Posted by Robert Goodman
If you take absolutely nothing else from author Felicity Young's Cam Fraser series, then it should serve as a reminder of how important volunteer fire services are in rural communities Australia-wide.
Posted by Karen
Emotion, reaction, damage and recovery are at the core of B Michael Radburn’s dark thrillers. Full review at: Newtown Review of Books
Posted by Karen
Sometimes a book just simply drops out of nowhere straight into the best of the year list with minimal fanfare. TELL THE TRUTH, SHAME THE DEVIL is undoubtedly going to remain one of the best things I've read this year for a whole lot of reasons.
Posted by Karen
For a series that initially was only going to run for a couple of books, the Leone Scarmacio series seems to have developed legs. The Hit is the third in the series and leaves plenty of balls in the air for future instalments. Which is welcome as this is a series that has improved with each outing.
Posted by Robert Goodman
This is a very polished work from a debut author.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
THE FIREMAN for sure has that post apocalyptic wonder (who will survive, how will they survive?) and does a good job of conveying the fear and confusion in one pocket of the world as it all goes to hell.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Signal Loss is another strong entry in this series which brings both its characters and its concerns bang up to date.
Posted by Robert Goodman
People who love the golden age of detective fiction, who, as Susan puts it, like to curl up with a cosy mystery when it is raining outside knowing that everything will be explained at the end, or who spend their Friday nights in Midsomer (a place which gets named checked far too many times in this novel) will love Magpie Murders.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Even if you've only had a very fleeting interest in the goings on of one of Australia's most (in)famous cops, then ROGER ROGERSON is going to be an extremely intriguing read.
Posted by Karen
Styled as a thriller from the legal world, CYANIDE GAMES introduces Peter Tanner - criminal defence barrister, widower, father. Very much one of the good guys, one of those that takes on a hell of a lot and seems to pull results together despite the odds.
Posted by Karen
James Patterson has been working with a number of crime writers recently, producing these co-authored books, so it's hard not to read each one playing a sort of "who wrote what" game in your head.
Posted by Karen
Sometimes you just can't shake the idea that an author really doesn't like their characters much. Flaws and troubles aplenty are one thing - but weighing everybody down in a story with just about every possible problem known is another kettle of fish altogether.
Posted by Karen
KILLING LOVE is one of the most profoundly personal stories that you're going to come across in True Crime reading.
Posted by Karen
NOTHING SHORT OF DYING is the debut release from author Erik Storey, which arrived with considerable fanfare. It's flagged as something that will have Lee Child's Reacher watching over his shoulder which clearly flags this is action packed, with a lone hero up against it from all sides central character.
Posted by Karen
... as the pieces fall into place it is clear that Maitland has had tight control on his overarching plot from the beginning of this series so that Slaughter Park is both a compulsive and satisfying conclusion.
Posted by Robert Goodman
In an age of throwaway domestic thrillers with the word “Girl” in the title, Dead in the Water shows the breadth of the Australian crime fiction scene.
Posted by Robert Goodman
'Watch out Jo Nesbo!' is printed in a bright red circle on the front of I'M TRAVELLING ALONE. It seemed like a rather brave claim to be making before starting this book, and bordering on rash having now finished it.
Posted by Karen
It is a sometimes violent, sometimes dangerous, sometimes poetic and insightful debut Australian novel.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Written by an author who has spent some time in Pentridge as a worker / teacher this is one of those books that's really fascinating when it's getting into the nitty gritty of life behind bars ...
Posted by Karen
The follow up to a fascinating book Australia's Most Murderous Prison, AUSTRALIA'S TOUGHEST PRISONS: INMATES tells the story of a number of people in prison - for a change not all of the usual role-call of participants that show up in these sorts of books.
Posted by Karen
The historical context not only highlights how attitudes have changed since the 1940s but how the attitudes of those times are still not far from the surface.
Posted by Robert Goodman
There's room in Australian crime fiction for two lone-wolf anti-hero types, and Wyatt's got some serious competition now.
Posted by Karen
While Underground Airlines shares much of its messaging with recent books and films about slavery it also joins a list of provocative alternate histories such as Fatherland and The Yiddish Policeman’s Union which use crime fiction tropes to explore and expose their worlds.
Posted by Robert Goodman
BLOOD WEDDING is gripping and very cleverly constructed.
Posted by Karen
Needing something that would be reliably good recently, TRACES OF RED was just the thing as Paddy Richardson is a particularly talented writer of psychological thrillers.
Posted by Karen
BAD BLOOD is accessible crime / thriller / paranormal / action packed day to day life style storytelling.
Posted by Karen
Michel Bussi is a renowned crime fiction writer and winner of many awards in his native France, BLACK WATER LILIES being the second of his books translated into English.
Posted by Karen
As much as I'd love to say that if you're a new reader to this series than just get on with it, it's one that you really have to read in order.
Posted by Karen
Everything in TWO DAYS indicates that DRAINLAND is going to be a hell of a read...
Posted by Karen
It's a question that has preyed on a lot of people's minds over the years - why do women fall for the worst possible men?
Posted by Karen
In a leadup event to the 2016 Bendigo Writers Festival, Gideon Haigh came to Dunolly for a discussion with Rosemary Sorensen about CERTAIN ADMISSIONS.
Posted by Karen
It's great to see something as topical as genetic modification of food crops set in somewhere that's not normally known as a big threat / big risk location.
Posted by Karen
Caleb Carr is probably best known for his historical crime fiction debut The Alienist. That book, and its sequel, Angel of Darkness, set around turn of the century New York City and, later upstate New York, explored the early days of criminal psychology.
Posted by Robert Goodman
For a cricket obsessed reader, fond of the assertion that test cricket is a metaphor for life, THE RULES OF BACKYARD CRICKET made me wonder about that just for a moment.
Posted by Karen
There is a very good reason for all the buzz around about The Dry, another great debut thriller from an Australian writer. Review at Newtown Review of Books
Posted by Karen
An astounding debut novel, this was a most unusual, and very rewarding read.
Posted by Karen
DEAD MEN DON'T ORDER FLAKE obviously comes from the entertaining side of crime fiction.
Posted by Karen
Look for the sly sense of humour in these books (which frequently tipped over into outright laughter for this reader), and past the bombastic outer shell of William Power, because THE SERPENT'S STING is a worthy addition to a series of novels that must come highly recommended.
Posted by Karen
MIMA is a profoundly personal recounting of the death of a friend.
Posted by Karen
L.A. Larkin’s third thriller takes readers back to Antarctica, the setting of her last novel Thirst, but with a new cast of characters and a new global threat.
Posted by Robert Goodman
... enjoyable for what it is and thriller fans will be kept happy as the pages turn.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Great idea, execution needs a little more emotion and colour.
Posted by Karen
Putting the genre mash element aside, Made to Kill is overall just a lot of fun.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Pufferfish is one of my all time favourite Australian Crime Fiction identities. He's taciturn, reticent and often recalcitrant. He's frequently obtuse, often slightly grumpy, addicted to strong espresso and liquorice all-sorts and finally, he's back.
Posted by Karen
It feels like such a relief to have a woman in Cabin 10, and not a girl, that you'd almost be forgiven for cutting THE WOMAN IN CABIN 10 a lot of slack.
Posted by Karen
A slow moving novel about loss; both its enormity and of how shocking it is to the grieving that life simply must go on, regardless of what has been unexpectedly and horrifically taken from them.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
This clever thriller should be a huge hit and spark much discussion.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
One for the fans and anyone else who wants to be entertained for a short and happy while
Posted by Andrea Thompson