All Reviews

The Job is the third book in this series but not having read the first two instalments is no impediment to picking this one up.

Posted by Robert Goodman

A most unexpected novel, wonderfully original, clever, compassionate and revealing, ELIZABETH IS MISSING was an absolute privilege to read.

Posted by Karen

Thrillers involving bad marriages are coming thick and fast, both to the bookshelf and the screen.

Posted by Robert Goodman

The PC Peter Grant series, of which Foxglove Summer is the fifth instalment, could be described as Harry Potter for grown ups. But it is more than this - part supernatural, part police procedural and part observational humour - at times the series is more Terry Pratchett than JK Rowling.

Posted by Robert Goodman

A New Zealand born, Australian and Northern Ireland dwelling, now Iceland based author has written a book set in his adopted city of Reykjavík, with a central female character whose life is turned upside down in a very short space of time, that really works.

Posted by Karen

Is it a bad thing, that at the end of book one, it was hard to suppress a certain sense of disappointment that there's only going to be 2 more?

Posted by Karen

Crucifixion Creek marks an exciting shift in direction for Maitland into truly Australian crime fiction.

Posted by Robert Goodman

There's so much in this series that, for this reader, is a highlight, and THE MISSING AND THE DEAD is right up there with the best of the lot of them.

Posted by Karen

As always from Jo Nesbo, dark, introspective, thoughtful and fascinating.

Posted by Karen

The 4th book in the Max Cámara series, which means if, like this reader, you've missed the first three, there's something to look forward to.

Posted by Karen

Translated from the original German, UNTIL THE DEBT IS PAID is a combination police procedural and energiser bunny styled action thriller which starts out running when Detective Jan Tommen wakes up beside his beloved girlfriend one morning to find himself as the chief suspect in a vicious murder.

Posted by Karen

Right from the commencement of HADES, the first Archer / Bennett book by Candice Fox, it was obvious that this was a series to be watched.

Posted by Karen

BENT leaves you considering the possible outcomes had the amount of effort, and the level of organisation that has been put into the crime side of the "policing" environments, had gone to actual crime solving.

Posted by Karen

When the blurb says "In Northern Ireland's darkest corner" it means it. It's winter, it's wet, dark, cold and black. A landscape full of old houses, swamps and fast running streams, there's an overwhelming sense of dark, deep, close-held, life-long, simmering secrets in the world that Inspector Celcius Daly now lives.

Posted by Karen

Quite a few crime fiction books use the life and crimes of a Gangster type as their central premise, with a sideline of the impact that has on family and friends. BAD BLOOD looks at this scenario with the affected firmly at the centre of the action.

Posted by Karen

The resolution is an interesting surprise which manages to throw more light on the politics of the time and the end implies that there may well be more Shardlake to come, which is by no means a bad thing.

Posted by Robert Goodman

The Dark is Valentina Gaimbanco's follow up to her debut novel The Gift of Darkness. The events of the new novel follow hard on the heels of the first and in some ways, this sequel fills in much of the backstory of key characters from her debut.

Posted by Robert Goodman

A very detailed, academic analysis of the issue of Indigenous incarceration, ARRESTING INCARCERATION: PATHWAYS OUT OF INDIGENOUS IMPRISONMENT is sobering, difficult, and confronting reading.

Posted by Karen

Iwasaki Shiro is a hard-working, Japanese family man. With a controlling wife, disrespectful children, and a murder fantasy. Most of what Shiro does is somehow never quite right.

Posted by Karen

From the blurb, you can probably work out that this isn't a noir styled book. A lot of the attraction comes from the eccentricity of both Gerhard Self, and the style of storytelling, which is often slightly arch and funny.

Posted by Karen

PRISONER OF NIGHT AND FOG is built on a particularly challenging premise - that the central character in this book, Gretchen Müller, is a protégé of Adolf Hilter.

Posted by Karen

As always, the real problem with this series is that it's impossible to read any of them and not be hungry. And somewhat disappointed that your fridge doesn't reveal the sorts of delicacies that Montalbano's does.

Posted by Karen

Steamy is right – and not just the weather. THE MORUTAU AFFAIR was not what I was expecting.

Posted by Karen

It's taken quite a few attempts to read CASEBOOK, it's been one of the most picked up and discarded books in the review pile for quite a while.

Posted by Karen

Darkly funny at times, especially when getting the gloves off and stuck into the hypocrisy, and the stupidity, and the bastardry, it's a reminder of just how treacherous people can be.

Posted by Karen

Definitely one that fans of the cozy style of crime fiction should be clamouring to read, and most definitely something that Australian readers should be seeking out.

Posted by Karen

Definitely not my sort of book.

Posted by Karen

This makes Malice the complete package – a crime novel that has both a twisting narrative and fascinating themes.

Posted by Robert Goodman

I've read MERCY (aka THE KEEPER OF LOST CAUSES) by Jussi Adler-Olsen twice now and finally I think I've got it the review straight in my head.

Posted by Karen

It was somewhat bitter-sweet to know that on reading this book, Joe Faraday is dead, and another series over. Which I confess is a lot of the reason for the delay.

Posted by Karen

What holds the reader to this series is that sense of an entire world, and the bringing to life of history, combined with strong plots, and wonderful characters that you're given full permission to like.

Posted by Karen

Sherlock Holmes is the detective who cannot die. Arthur Conan Doyle tried, vainly to kill Holmes off in 1893. Wanting to concentrate on his historical novels, Conan Doyle famously killed Holmes and his arch nemesis Moriarty, sending them both plunging into Switzerland’s Reichenbach Falls. But it couldn’t last.

Posted by Robert Goodman

BROKEN MONSTERS might not be the easiest read in the world, but it is less of a serial killer exposé and a lot more about about damage and society on the extremes.

Posted by Karen

Whatever I thought THE GIRL IN 6E was about, I can't begin to tell you how wrong I was. Having said that I'm also now considerably more educated about the world of paid Internet sex services than I ever thought I wanted to be.

Posted by Karen

The combination of cars and girls makes absolute sense to me. Include them in a series of noir styled, dark and pointed short stories, and CARS & GIRLS from the Pankhurst Collective was both unexpected and an absolute pleasure to read.

Posted by Karen

A thriller set in what's becoming the familiar territory of Iraq and Afghanistan, Pakistan's status as a nuclear nation plays into the action in KILL ZONE.

Posted by Karen

THE BOMB MAKERS by pseudonymous author Marcus Case is a terrorist thriller set in London, with the threat coming from a combination of ETA and the Real IRA. Which is a different combination for this reader.

Posted by Karen

This is going to have to be another one of those reviews that comes with a disclaimer. I love Adrian McKinty's books. Although I will admit that it's always been the dark side, his flawed and controversial characters, and his noir stylings that I'd thought appealed particularly.

Posted by Karen

... suddenly there's a moral dilemma you're going to have to do a bit of thinking about. Which is exactly what a psychological thriller of this kind should do.

Posted by Karen

If ever there was a book that I wished had been fictional, but am pleased Mori had the courage and conviction to write - this is it.

Posted by Karen

.... think of this as less of a review and more a restating of the reasons why I was really pleased that Clan Destine Press decided to publish TELL ME WHY.

Posted by Karen

Whilst there's been a lot of books written about the various players from the Underworld side of the equation, this is the first that this reader can remember that takes that further.

Posted by Karen

An unusual approach, and not just because of the fly fishing, THE CHILDREN'S POND wasn't at all what I'd expected. In a good way.

Posted by Karen

From the moment that Billy Hotchkiss hits Hell Corner on the opening lap of the Bathurst 1000 you can tell he's a man on a mission. That's likely to end up pear-shaped as everyone knows that "The Mountain" is an unforgiving beast.

Posted by Karen

THE REAL CHOPPER actually has a lot to say about the making of celebrity, and myths and legends. It's a particularly salutary tale when you look at what passes for a lot of "popular culture" these days.

Posted by Karen

Le French Book have released some excellent French crime fiction, translated into English, of which THE 7TH WOMAN by Frédérique Molay is already an international bestseller.

Posted by Karen

Loved this idea when I first heard about it - a set of fictional adventures for a real-life movie star. And one that even I've heard of!

Posted by Karen

OXCRIMES, from Profile books is a fundraising book of short crime stories with contributions from a strong group of authors - some of whom will be favourites, many of whom will be new to readers.

Posted by Karen

The second Lexie Rogers book from ex-cop Karen M Davis, it's interesting to note that we've now got a couple of female ex-cops from similar areas writing police procedural style books, although to this reader's eye, completely different sensibilities.

Posted by Karen

You'd be almost tempted to get people to read CHASING THE ACE if only as a warning about the sorts of scams and tricks being perpetrated in the real world. Doesn't hurt that it's an entertaining read along the way.

Posted by Karen