Latest Reviews

Always present, always watching. The Tall Man comes for your daughters. What to do when you have given yourself over to the Tall Man, and then you have a daughter of your own? You disappear.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
RETRIBUTION is an elegantly written novel that convincingly takes the reader to a place of both great beauty and deep ugliness.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Completing the AustCrimeFiction trifecta, my turn to read this excellent debut novel.
Posted by Karen
Fans of MADE TO KILL will already know all about Ray Electromatic, Ada and his line of work.
Posted by Karen
It has been another great year for Australian crime debuts and Derval McTiernan’s The Rùin continues this run. Much like Adrian McKinty, McTiernan sets her first Cormac Reilly novel in the old country, aka Ireland. But her take, while still procedural, is more contemporary and less overtly political.
Posted by Robert Goodman
DIG TWO GRAVES relies heavily on a descriptive, languid writing style, full of portents and observations, internal musings and a lot of that angst, longing and regret. This will be a novel that works incredibly well for fans of that style.
Posted by Karen
Author Michalia Arathimos has Greek-New Zealand heritage which is strongly reflected in her novel AUKATI. Set in New Zealand, this is a crime novel based around the scourge that is fracking.
Posted by Karen
Australian Rural Crime novels are the new big thing, and Scrublands is the one that everyone is talking about.
Posted by Karen

Recommendations

Cop-turned novelist, Nathan Blackwell (true identity hidden due to covert police operations) has written a debut novel, THE SOUND OF HER VOICE, which is intense, unsparing, realistic, brutal and will stay with the reader for a long time.
If you're a fan of any of Stuart MacBride's books - the Logan McRae series, the Ash Henderson series, his Christmas series (I kid you not), or his standalones then you will have hot footed it to the bookshop for this one already. If for some reason you missed it, then off you go.
THE FAMILY NEXT DOOR reinforces the notion that despite being constantly surrounded by people, you can often feel alone. Deep suburbia provides such a huge source of material and is finally in drama fiction being recognized for that richness.
Where are the women here? They support, they assist – and they prosecute. Accused of raping a young woman in an elevator at Parliament, James is suddenly no longer bullet proof. His wife is no longer by his side. His government may no longer be so benevolent. Those he crossed in the past will no longer be silent.
It has been a very long time since Anna has been able to put foot outside her own door. But this does not mean that she does not observe life outside.
The good news is I'm so far behind with this review, that the second book in the series is out now. Which means you've got a series on your hands!
Leaping with confidence straight out of the gates, DEAD LEMONS has a cracking opening chapter that will stay with you for quite some time. You just can’t go past a man hanging over a cliff, hanging upside down in his wheelchair, thinking such dire and witty thoughts.
Author David Lagercrantz confidently continues his commissioned task of continuing the Millennium series, two novels in after the death of fellow Swedish author Stieg Larsson.

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From my weekend's reading, this thriller, first in a series based around US SEAL and a threat to the US mainland.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
I will catch up with all these mini-reviews, mentions, the backlist from hell. I will....
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Jack Heath is well known for plenty of books for children and young adults but, clearly, some elements were missing. These included, among other things – violence, blood, drugs and serial killers. And so we get Hangman, which has lashings of all of these elements and is a cracking read full of well crafted twists and turns.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
As one American family enjoys their break at their Scottish holiday home, a terrible sickness is released when blood is spilt on ancient magical land.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
Author David Lagercrantz confidently continues his commissioned task of continuing the Millennium series, two novels in after the death of fellow Swedish author Stieg Larsson.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review

Too Easy continues an absolutely terrific series that falls on the noirish side of comic farce. Full Review at:  Newtown Review of Books

Posted by Karen
Book Review
Nice combination of societies full of mildly potty types (pun intended) and a nicely dotty murder.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Perhaps don't do what I'm doing and binge listen to these.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
I am still reading things - I'm just a bit slow off the mark on posting anything.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Adam Roberts never does the same thing twice. While he has written novels with a crime element it is safe to say that The Real-Town Murders is something completely different again.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
Places in the Darkness is a great read, period and recommended for crime readers, scifi aficionados or just anyone who likes a good book.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
Gothic horror is back in vogue and it does not get much more gothic than Laura Purcell’s debut The Silent Companions.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Blog entry
I've been dipping into this collection now for a while, working my way through an amazing range of short stories, all set in Australia, written by local authors harking back to the style of Arthur Conan Doyle. As is always the way there's something for everyone in these.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
I started this the other night and was enthralled from the start. For our first 2018 f2f bookclub gathering.
Posted by Karen
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Promised myself this would be my Boxing Day Test reading this year - which turned out to be the perfect choice, what with that awful wicket.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
Another from the over Christmas / New Year pile - this time a republished historical novel with heaps of interesting background to it.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
Took a little break over Christmas / New Year. Did some reading (not enough). Did some work around the farm (too much). Melted in the heat (a lot). Drank some ridiculously lovely wine (never enough). Ate chocolate (mind your own business about how much). Read a Stuart MacBride novel that featured Roberta Steel which made me happy.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Planning a wedding to his newly immortal partner Julie, Ramses the Great has much to regret and much to look forward to. Now living life as Reginald Ramsay, Egyptologist, Ramses has kept his secrets to a chosen few and has found fresh hope in the modern age of the early 19th century.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
Dang. We all really wanted to love this book after the monster science hug that THE MARTIAN unexpectedly gave us a few years back. The geek science is still there to be enjoyed - detailed and highly credible, and you never have cause to doubt the intelligence and passion of author Andy Weir here in his field of interest.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Blog entry
I'm behind with everything and bloody hate coming up with Top howevermany's
Posted by Karen
Book Review
I've spent a silly amount of time driving recently, and these really work as a background to the endless kilometres.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
I confess to having been a mad fan of Dave Warner's music. It makes me very happy that the stories he tells in his books are longer in form, but still so clearly about life as it happens in Australia.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Chris Whitaker's debut novel TALL OAKS garnered a lot of positive publicity and a CWA John Creasey New Blood Dagger award.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
The Lone Child focuses on character development, imbued with sadness, longing, regret and loss. Reviewed at Newtown Review of Books
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
Having now officially completely lost control of Mt TBR I'm randomly picking things based on some criteria or another. So I started this one over the weekend. Not sorry.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
You have to admire any author who doesn't just create a profoundly unlikeable protagonist but then grants them full permission to be as ordinary a human being as they can possibly be.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
A terrific thriller, FROM THE SHADOWS, is fast-paced and populated by extremely interesting characters embroiled in a clever story plot that twists, turns and sneaks around more than enough to keep the reader guessing until the end.
Posted by Karen
Books
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Book Review
I forgot NOTHING BAD HAPPENS HERE was a debut novel as you'd never know it from reading it.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
A two sitting read from 2017 Ngaio Marsh Award winner. There's something about this author's work ...
Posted by Karen
Book Review
It's probably not going to come as any surprise to find that DON'T LET GO jumped up the reading queue as quickly as possible, because every novel from Michel Bussi I've read now has been clever, different and intriguing.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
... not a straightforward history, romance or crime fiction novel, but a mash-up, and one this reader found extremely engaging.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
The re-examining of the murder of Charles Buhrman brings Josie and her family to the fresh attention of a voracious new content hungry generation who are keen for the thrill and less interested in the damage that was done to the two young children in the house at the time of the murder.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
The disappearance of Melody Chapa ten years ago was one of those cases that gripped the public. Though Melody’s body was never recovered, her parents are in prison serving time for her murder and the case remained in the public eye thanks to occasional ‘sightings’ and sporadic media attention.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
It is unclear why Burnet feels the need to play the meta-narrative games with his crime fiction except maybe to find an excuse to write novels in this style. And he does it well, crafting a crime novel that is more about the effects of a crime and its investigation and resolution than a crime itself.
Posted by Robert Goodman