Latest Reviews

Cold-case detectives are everywhere these days, but the latest creation from Garry Disher, Alan Auhl, is not as straightforward as some might expect. Full review at Newtown Review of Books
Posted by Karen
Ted Lewis's Jack's Return Home, the book which Get Carter, arguably one of the greatest gangster films of all time, was based upon.
Posted by Gordon Duncan
Having now listened to the first couple of books in the series, I think I'll stick with them in audio format as the dialogue, the place names, even the thought patterns of the characters are quintessentially Scottish and part of the enjoyment was hearing it in just the right accent.
Posted by Karen
There's plenty to this plot, to Sam Andie himself, and to events around the time that he was murdered to keep a reader involved and occupied.
Posted by Karen
ABSOLUTE PROOF is a rare thing in these parts - a "did not finish".
Posted by Karen
This is an embarrassingly overdue mention of the second novel in a series which is going from strength to strength.
Posted by Karen
On the lighter than air side of the cozy spectrum this is a series that will appeal to readers who like a bit of self-aware silly in their crime fiction.
Posted by Karen
Hard going, with an authentic voice that makes it emotionally challenging and confronting, COLOMBIANO is well worth pursuing - even if the size is off-putting. This reads, feels and is telegraphed in the prologue as something this author was passionately driven to produce.
Posted by Karen

Recommendations

Ted Lewis's Jack's Return Home, the book which Get Carter, arguably one of the greatest gangster films of all time, was based upon.
Well paced out, populated by flawed but approachable characters, set in a location that doesn't feel manipulative or convenient, GREENLIGHT is about crime, greed, money, influence, bad decisions and human frailty and nastiness.
... this is good rural-noir. It comes from the place and the people that it's written about and it's got the authority, and the touch that comes from living in the world that it's describing.
Completing the AustCrimeFiction trifecta, my turn to read this excellent debut novel.
Cop-turned novelist, Nathan Blackwell (true identity hidden due to covert police operations) has written a debut novel, THE SOUND OF HER VOICE, which is intense, unsparing, realistic, brutal and will stay with the reader for a long time.
If you're a fan of any of Stuart MacBride's books - the Logan McRae series, the Ash Henderson series, his Christmas series (I kid you not), or his standalones then you will have hot footed it to the bookshop for this one already. If for some reason you missed it, then off you go.
THE FAMILY NEXT DOOR reinforces the notion that despite being constantly surrounded by people, you can often feel alone. Deep suburbia provides such a huge source of material and is finally in drama fiction being recognized for that richness.
Where are the women here? They support, they assist – and they prosecute. Accused of raping a young woman in an elevator at Parliament, James is suddenly no longer bullet proof. His wife is no longer by his side. His government may no longer be so benevolent. Those he crossed in the past will no longer be silent.

Latest Postings

Blog entry
So I read this one over the weekend but it's another that a review will come out in the next day or so, in the meantime ... read it.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
One that I finished over the weekend - review to come asap.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Cop-turned novelist, Nathan Blackwell (true identity hidden due to covert police operations) has written a debut novel, THE SOUND OF HER VOICE, which is intense, unsparing, realistic, brutal and will stay with the reader for a long time.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
An immersive and convincing novel about secrets and survival set in one of the harshest of environments – an Australian outback town during an extended drought.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
Powerful and poetic, life affirming and heart wrenching. Welcome again to the dark world of the private detective Charlie Parker.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
THE OTHER WIFE is the latest bittersweet entry in an excellent series that progressively takes a little bit more of your heart with each encounter.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
Kiwi-Irish author Julie Parsons book THE THERAPY HOUSE is an intricate pscyhological observation, interweaving current day crime with Irish history to great effect.
Posted by Karen
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The Frankston Murders, which has been just been republished by Clan Destine Press in a revised edition to commemorate the 25th anniversary of a seven-week killing spree that traumatised families and the community.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Crime Fiction set in the art world is a little mined area of interest, and in Katherine Kovacic's novel, THE PORTRAIT OF MOLLY DEAN, it's gold.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
From this account it seems that Mollie Dean was a beautiful, clever, talented young woman who was keen to make a mark and achieve something in her life. Her life was taken from her in the most brutal of manners because somebody wanted to control that. Who did that and why, readers will have to decide for themselves.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Steve Cavanagh’s Eddie Flynn legal thrillers have been one of the best thing to happen to the courtroom drama in a long time.
Posted by Robert Goodman
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The Ned Kelly Awards are on Sunday 26th August in Melbourne at the Toff in Town
Posted by Karen
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Catching up on some of the true crime books stacked about the place.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
THE TRIALS OF MINNIE DEAN is a beautifully constructed, extremely thought-provoking and moving book. It is one that I've now revisited many times since my initial reading.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
The world sure as hell needs something to laugh at, and it could use a lot more caper novels.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Set in the early twentieth century in mannered and beautiful Dunedin, New Zealand there are plenty of similarities between the stories of Mr Mancini and the delightfully idiosyncratic Hercule Poirot.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Easy reading, with a casual, almost chatty style and an engaging central character, DEATH ON D'URVILLE ticks the boxes you'd want on something that's leaning towards the romantic suspense side of the genre.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
RED HERRING is dryly funny in places, deliberately dark and sparse, and an absolute page turner. It's a combination of history, mystery and reality set in something almost cinematic in quality, with heaps of dark places, a few light touches and some extremely good characters.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
Following on from Gideon Haigh's A Scandal in Bohemia, a factual account of the life and fate of Molly Dean, now The Portrait of Molly Dean, a fictional look back and Molly's life from the point of view of independent art dealer Alex Cayton. A fabulous read.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
THE RUIN is so confidently written with fully rounded characters that we are assured of some great reading from this series in the future.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
In The Other Wife Robotham once again demonstrates why he is not only one of the best thriller writers in Australia but one of the best thriller writers in the world.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Books
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
This year’s longlist for the Ned Kelly Awards announced by the Australian Crime Writers Association celebrates the novels of well established crime writers and talented newcomers.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
... with this expansion of her world, it feels like Gemma Woodstock might be with us for a while.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
There's much in this book that's confronting and discomforting, and it's not straight forward reading, but it's worthwhile reading, digging into 1970's Australian rural life, dysfunctional families, and adult behaviour that has lasting consequences.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
LIFTING is one of those books that is charming, slightly eccentric, sad, happy, and wonderfully engaging.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
A testament to the legacy of lifelong friendships, MY HUSBANDS LIES is a clever page turner about childhood alliances and their evolution over time.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
THE INNOCENT WIFE is a conceivable nightmare with nothing to cushion the inevitable fall. If you’re in the mood for some harsh lighting in your crime reading, THE INNOCENT WIFE will deliver.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Blog entry
Finished this late last night because I wanted to read it and because next up (after a bookclub read) it's Katherine Koviac's book The Portrait of Molly Dean.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
The Escape Room does what a good thriller should do. It takes something new and faddish, in this case escape room games, and makes it sinister.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
The Nowhere Child is an assured, page-turning debut.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Blog entry
I've been doing a lot of "required reading" recently, so indulging myself in random dips into the Discworld series on audio book.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
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Turns out that injury to my partner (he's okay) is something that will bite into my reading time.
Posted by Karen
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Started this one last night.
Posted by Karen
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I am sort of keeping pace with myself again, having just finished this book...
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
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Posted by Karen
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Posted by Karen
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Posted by Karen
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I am actually reading this one right now. I'm all caught up in other words!
Posted by Karen
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Latest, just finished read. Hopefully this is the start of another series.
Posted by Karen
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Nearly caught up now - finished this earlier this week.
Posted by Karen
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It's been quite a while since I caught up with these listings as you can probably tell by now.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
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Another from the pile up of things I should have mentioned a week ago.
Posted by Karen
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Another from the have read pile - this is the 3rd book in the Natalie King series.
Posted by Karen