Latest Reviews

David Whish-Wilson is best known for his historical crime fiction set in Perth and surrounds, but The Coves takes us to 1849 San Francisco, gold fever and the Australian gangs who controlled the part of it known as Sydney-town. Newtown Review of Books
Posted by Karen
The Rowland Sinclair series is an interesting one. It's gentle and funny in places. It's characters are vivid, it's sense of place and time light and breezy, yet peppered with reminders of where the world was heading.
Posted by Karen
Peter Temple's 2nd novel and my latest summer favourite.
Posted by Gordon Duncan
Holly Throsby's excellent 2nd novel.
Posted by Gordon Duncan
I've been trying to think of somebody else that could write books about abalone fishing quotas, cricket, asylum seekers and now early white Australian settlement, convicts, rum runners and shipwrecks and make them all equally compelling, memorable, and ... crime fiction.
Posted by Karen
Absolutely no doubt about it - Pankhurst and what she does for a living are fascinating stories.
Posted by Karen
The second in the Cass Diamond series MISSING PIECES is set in far North Queensland, with Cass Diamond investigating connected cold case disappearances.
Posted by Karen
It's been a while since the last Brock & Kolla outing (THE RAVEN'S EYE in 2013 to be precise) and this reader has missed them. They are one of the great, solid, reliable, enduring duo's of crime fiction and it's good to see THE PROMISED LAND indicating there is some fuel left in their combined tanks.
Posted by Karen

Recommendations

Peter Temple's 2nd novel and my latest summer favourite.
Holly Throsby's excellent 2nd novel.
I've been trying to think of somebody else that could write books about abalone fishing quotas, cricket, asylum seekers and now early white Australian settlement, convicts, rum runners and shipwrecks and make them all equally compelling, memorable, and ... crime fiction.
The murderous adventures of Maud, an 88 year lady living in Gothenburg, Sweden
The winner of the 2018 McIlvanney Prize for best Scottish crime book.
The second Jack Parlabane novel.
It is thirty years from now and we have colonised the moon.
This was without a doubt, one of the most intriguing books I've encountered this year and it reminded me, yet again, that Antti Tuomainen is a writer who deserves (and now has) a much higher position on the must read list.

Latest Postings

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Fell over the first in the series via the Ned Kelly listings in recent years - particularly pleased to see a 2nd novel in the series now out.
Posted by Karen
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From the weekend's pile - really liked the earlier one in this series.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
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From last week's reading pile.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
The death of Maria Turquand had all the ingredients that would have appealed to the salacious public forty years ago; a beautiful woman, gangsters, drugs and rock stars.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
Pursued, bedded and betrayed by her husband the King, Anne Boleyn's story is equally as complex as it is tragic. Anne through both whim and circumstance comes to possess exactly the same ambitions as her bullish husband - to rule absolute, and to provide an heir to the English throne.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
A take on a noir romp with stylised good cop / bad cop characters, humour is a huge part of GOOD COP BAD COP.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Some promise shown here.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
THE ASSASSIN ON THE BANGKOK EXPRESS is the second book in a series sub-titled "The Honourable Assassin", the first (with that title) released in 2015.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Whether or not this should be marketed as YA is debatable, but either way it is a great Scandi-crime novel that almost demands to be read in a single sitting.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
... weighted heavily on the romance side, with a tendency towards a showy style of descriptive text to reinforce the period setting.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
The verdicts are in: new Kiwi voices dominate among 2017 Ngaios finalists
Posted by Karen
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Announcement: 2017 Ned Kelly Award Shortlists
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Ten years of two families missing their two children of course takes its toll. One couple survives the aftermath of the kidnappings and the other does not. So what will happen now that only one of the two boys is coming home?
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
Something very clever is being mined from our collective pop culture psyche here, and that is the fascination we have with the last person standing. Plane crashes, shootings, natural disasters etc; it's the sole survivors that fascinate.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
Jock Serong seems to determined to shine a light on every dodgy part of Australian culture.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
... while Gentill is returning to the world of Roland Sinclair, she has shown quite emphatically that she can leave Sinclair behind whenever she wants and go exploring in a wider literary landscape.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
The dizzy freedom of a night out without her young son has terrible consequences for first time mother Sally.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
Many years have passed since Dr Jekyll suddenly left London society. Lawyer Mr Utterson, seemingly steadfast in his continued assistance to the absent Dr Jekyll, has been busy making plans. Lasting plans, and they include a lady’s affection.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
BURN PATTERNS was a most unusual reading experience. Bet you any money, it leaves as many readers unsatisfied, as it does those keen for more.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Coming at an eco-thriller from the point of view of the activists, RUBY AND THE BLUE SKY is part thriller, part exploration of "celebrity" culture, and part do good chick lit novel.
Posted by Karen
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Started this one last night.
Posted by Karen
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Second from this weekend's reading pile.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
The Twentieth Man is an incredibly assured debut novel and Jones has delivered a pacey and original historical thriller.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
The potential here is undoubtedly in plot imagining - the idea behind this is very intriguing, the over-the-top action very reminiscent of gung-ho thrillers, with some good twists and turns.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
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Really enjoyed the first of this series, Through a Camel's Eye.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Known for her Rowland Sinclair historical crime series and her YA Hero trilogy, Sulari Gentill delivers something very different with this new novel. Full review at Newtown Review of Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
In 2005, the Police and Justice Museum in Sydney had an exhibition of police photographs from the early twentieth century. One of these that caught the eye of author Pip Smith was of a man called Harry Crawford, arrested for murder.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
A vengeance styled thriller, set in Asia, PAYBACK tackles sex-trafficking and child abuse head on.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
When two young people go missing, it's first thought by the police that young love could be the reason why. Amaya and Kamal's respective families both had other plans for their future, and the control wielded over the lives of their children was both archaic and suffocating. Did the two leave their controlling families behind in order to map out their own lives? Or has someone taken them?
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
Well worth a look ... especially as a reminder that there is a world of difference between an autocrat and a strong leader.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Called to attend a crime scene in his own apartment complex, Wolf is faced with a cadaver that is nothing like he or anyone else in his division has ever seen before.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Blog entry
A slight change of setting - moving to Tokyo and a book by an American Professor of Literature and author resident in Tokyo.
Posted by Karen
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I did some housekeeping over the weekend. The sort where you sweep all the books off the pile to be read and pluck out one that you really want to read. I did restack the pile again and promise I'm doing some catching up with badly overdue review books. But it was nice to get some tidying up done :)
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Hate it when a new book from a much loved series lingers too long on the reading pile simply because of competing priorities.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
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One from the should have read this ages ago pile.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
In 2016 the unpublished manuscript of Wimmera won the UK Crime Writers’ Association debut dagger – now it’s published and we can see why. Reviewed at Newtown Review of Books
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
Whilst not "strictly" crime fiction this is a fascinating intertwining tale that had me up way past when I should have nodded off last night.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Written by New Zealand based author Cat Connor, PSYCHOBYTE is book 8 in the Byte series based around FBI Agent Ellie Conway.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
THE ICE SHROUD is a very promising debut fictional novel from New Zealand wildlife photographer and non-fiction writer Gordon Ell.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
This is another finely tuned psychological thriller form Robotham, with the psychology of its protagonists front and centre and firmly driving the thriller element.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
The unaware, vaguely idiotic central character provides a deep mine of material for any type of slightly tongue in cheek story-telling, and UNFAITHFUL UNTO DEATH uses the premises in setting up Dr Cyril Peabody from the outset of the novel.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Mark Brandi’s Wimmera comes with an impressive pedigree even before it was published. It won a Debut Dagger from the British Crime Writer’s Association while still unpublished.
Posted by Robert Goodman