Latest Reviews

Having now listened to the first couple of books in the series, I think I'll stick with them in audio format as the dialogue, the place names, even the thought patterns of the characters are quintessentially Scottish and part of the enjoyment was hearing it in just the right accent.
Posted by Karen
There's plenty to this plot, to Sam Andie himself, and to events around the time that he was murdered to keep a reader involved and occupied.
Posted by Karen
ABSOLUTE PROOF is a rare thing in these parts - a "did not finish".
Posted by Karen
This is an embarrassingly overdue mention of the second novel in a series which is going from strength to strength.
Posted by Karen
On the lighter than air side of the cozy spectrum this is a series that will appeal to readers who like a bit of self-aware silly in their crime fiction.
Posted by Karen
Hard going, with an authentic voice that makes it emotionally challenging and confronting, COLOMBIANO is well worth pursuing - even if the size is off-putting. This reads, feels and is telegraphed in the prologue as something this author was passionately driven to produce.
Posted by Karen
When Ladd is exploring that central idea - "what happens when what is lost is found" - THE WAY BACK is indeed powerful. Moving, confronting, and very powerful.
Posted by Karen
There were so many reasons I wanted to love GET POOR SLOW.
Posted by Karen

Recommendations

Well paced out, populated by flawed but approachable characters, set in a location that doesn't feel manipulative or convenient, GREENLIGHT is about crime, greed, money, influence, bad decisions and human frailty and nastiness.
... this is good rural-noir. It comes from the place and the people that it's written about and it's got the authority, and the touch that comes from living in the world that it's describing.
Completing the AustCrimeFiction trifecta, my turn to read this excellent debut novel.
Cop-turned novelist, Nathan Blackwell (true identity hidden due to covert police operations) has written a debut novel, THE SOUND OF HER VOICE, which is intense, unsparing, realistic, brutal and will stay with the reader for a long time.
If you're a fan of any of Stuart MacBride's books - the Logan McRae series, the Ash Henderson series, his Christmas series (I kid you not), or his standalones then you will have hot footed it to the bookshop for this one already. If for some reason you missed it, then off you go.
THE FAMILY NEXT DOOR reinforces the notion that despite being constantly surrounded by people, you can often feel alone. Deep suburbia provides such a huge source of material and is finally in drama fiction being recognized for that richness.
Where are the women here? They support, they assist – and they prosecute. Accused of raping a young woman in an elevator at Parliament, James is suddenly no longer bullet proof. His wife is no longer by his side. His government may no longer be so benevolent. Those he crossed in the past will no longer be silent.
It has been a very long time since Anna has been able to put foot outside her own door. But this does not mean that she does not observe life outside.

Latest Postings

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The Australian Crime Writers Association (ACWA) announced the winners of the 2018 Ned Kelly Awards at a packed event at the Melbourne Writers’ Festival on 26 August.
Posted by Karen
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Book Review
Rural seems to be the new black in Australian crime fiction.
Posted by Robert Goodman
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Big change of pace, but I'm actually reading something written by someone who is not from our neck of the woods!
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Always present, always watching. The Tall Man comes for your daughters. What to do when you have given yourself over to the Tall Man, and then you have a daughter of your own? You disappear.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
RETRIBUTION is an elegantly written novel that convincingly takes the reader to a place of both great beauty and deep ugliness.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
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From the heaving great pile of reading matter that I'm very behind with.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Completing the AustCrimeFiction trifecta, my turn to read this excellent debut novel.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Fans of MADE TO KILL will already know all about Ray Electromatic, Ada and his line of work.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
I've been wanting to read this interesting analysis for sometime now so yesterday sat down and did so.
Posted by Karen
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We are nothing if not predictable here at AustCrimeFiction - and it's my turn to read this now.
Posted by Karen
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Book Review
It has been another great year for Australian crime debuts and Derval McTiernan’s The Rùin continues this run. Much like Adrian McKinty, McTiernan sets her first Cormac Reilly novel in the old country, aka Ireland. But her take, while still procedural, is more contemporary and less overtly political.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
DIG TWO GRAVES relies heavily on a descriptive, languid writing style, full of portents and observations, internal musings and a lot of that angst, longing and regret. This will be a novel that works incredibly well for fans of that style.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Author Michalia Arathimos has Greek-New Zealand heritage which is strongly reflected in her novel AUKATI. Set in New Zealand, this is a crime novel based around the scourge that is fracking.
Posted by Karen
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Book Review
Australian Rural Crime novels are the new big thing, and Scrublands is the one that everyone is talking about.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Feeling very much like an advertisement for gourmet South Australia with a slightly incongruous crime fiction element (wouldn't that turn potential visitors off...) THE POPEYE MURDER by Sandra Winter-Dewhirst is the first Rebecca Keith mystery.
Posted by Karen
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Book Review
Lynne Vincent McCarthy’s debut novel Lonely Girl is a thriller with a bit of a gender swap. Gone is the femjep woman kept in a basement. Instead, McCarthy turns the tables on this tired trope and in this psychological thriller puts the woman in charge.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
TAKE ME IN is an immersive read of guilt, deflection and the tangled webs we weave when everything goes wrong in our lives at once.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
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Book Review
How quickly your life can change from one of everyday normality to one of outright horror.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
The Seventh Cross is not only an important historical novel it is a timely one. It shows how a whole society can be turned by the lure of fascism.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
In the close quarters of an overcrowded ship packed with English, Irish and Scottish emigrants, disease waits.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
When Eliza Carmody returns to the small seaside town she grew up some things have changed, and a lot hasn't. Often the way when you return to the small town of your youth.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
He never once plays the "I was badly treated / it wasn't me" card. He was what he was, and he is now what he's made himself.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
There's a LOT of buzz going around about this one.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Only Killers and Thieves is an accomplished debut. Howarth manages to shine a stark light on a disturbing and often ignored aspect of Australian history – the systematic ‘dispersal’ of Aboriginal people to allow for the spread of agriculture.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
Keeping it all close and personal, GIVE ME YOUR HAND is a carefully crafted work that drip feeds dread directly into the veins.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Blog entry
My round up of the 2018 Ned Kelly Awards shortlist is now at Newtown Review of Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
THE NOWHERE CHILD is pointed commentary on fundamentalism of all persuasions, and a good reminder that the past doesn't always go quietly.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
Slight (okay extreme) change of pace.
Posted by Karen
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So I read this one over the weekend but it's another that a review will come out in the next day or so, in the meantime ... read it.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
One that I finished over the weekend - review to come asap.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Cop-turned novelist, Nathan Blackwell (true identity hidden due to covert police operations) has written a debut novel, THE SOUND OF HER VOICE, which is intense, unsparing, realistic, brutal and will stay with the reader for a long time.
Posted by Karen